The Dry is a thrilling tale with more to offer than meets the eye. Read our review below:

Eric Bana has quietly been one of our strongest character actors for a long time, but never quite achieved the leading man status many thought he would. The Dry gives him that chance in an atmospheric and engaging crime noire about the secrets we try to leave behind and how they always come back to haunt us. 

RELATED: THE FULL MONTY: NEW SERIES IN DEVELOPMENT WITH ORIGINAL CAST IN TALKS TO RETURN

It’s well-acted, offers up some solid red herrings, and ends on a devasting note that ensures I won’t soon forget it.

THE DRY EXPLORES GRIEF IN MANY WAYS

the dry - aaron falk

Agent Aaron Falk (Eric Bana) returns to his childhood hometown for the funeral of his long-ago best friend Luke and his family. Though it appears to have been a murder-suicide, Aaron feels his friend was innocent and sets out to solve the case, reconnecting with other friend Gretchen (Genevieve O’Reilly) for good measure. 

However, with untrustworthy townsfolk as well as his own secrets haunting him, Aaron must solve this outback murder fast or possibly die trying.

The Dry offers a two-for-one mystery special with its dual running narratives in the present and past.  Eric Bana proves himself ready for more leading roles and commands the lead with quiet confidence and intensity.  The supporting cast is strong with well-written supporting parts and the resolutions to both plotlines are emotionally impactful.  The Australian Outback offers beautiful, arid locations throughout and lends heavily to the film’s atmosphere, and the child actors playing younger versions of some characters impress as well. 

The film does a great job building anticipation for where both storylines are going and keeps its various narrative balls in the air without losing track of them and ensures both resolutions are unpredictable and effective.  The Dry is engaging, well-executed noire entertainment. See it.

the dry - aaron falk & gretchen

3.5 out of 5 stars (Above Average)

Rated R for Violence and Language Throughout.

KEEP READING: THE TENDER BAR REVIEW: BEN AFFLECK IS A SCENE STEALER IN CROWD PLEASING FILM